On Enthusiasm

When you do a Google search for “enthusiasm+L&D”, other than a single article by Jane Bozarth discussing the use of Pintrest boards for learning, the results quickly move to case law and Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

Enthusiasm is defined as “intense and eager enjoyment, interest or approval”.  Our sense, having sat with many CLO’s and comparing that to the enthusiastic energy inherent in fast growing startups is that our industry is sorely lacking enthusiasm. While we may experience excitement, a short duration form of enthusiasm, about new tools, technologies or toys, this is the emotional equivalent of a sugar high. As the last two decades have shown us, what we are running is a marathon, not a sprint, and sugar is not the fuel of success.

We know the importance of employee engagement. We have seen the studies on what drives it (mission, leadership, and development, among others). Yet when you talk to CLO’s the focus is often on the lack of funding, limited executive support or latest tool or tactic being deployed. Even the cup of sugar is half empty.  And when we talk with executives, we find they have a low expectation of training.  We believe that is because they really don’t know what is possible.  So how can we expect them to have any enthusiasm?

Successful startups have enthusiasm in abundance.  Founders actually take enthusiasm to the next level, passion.  Passion is an intense, driving feeling or conviction and while at points this may be divorced from reason it sets the highest possible standard for others to follow.  Sit with a founder for two minutes and they cannot help but tell you what they are building.  They will talk fast, as if they have had too many cups of coffee. Most importantly, they will leave you excited about their mission and looking for ways that you might help.

This is not only when they are talking to investors or customers. This is all the time. This is when they are talking with their teams, standing in line for lunch, sitting around with friends, riding the bus and walking their dog through the park.  If there are ears to listen they feel compelled, like new parents, to share. And this is not just the founders.

Successful founders recruit people that share their passion and contribute their own enthusiasm.  Enthusiasm is not solely enjoyment.  It is also “intense interest”. In this way enthusiasm leads to curiosity and curiosity often leads to new, novel, more effective or more efficient solutions. Coders frequently spend long days at work only to go home and play around writing code for fun or to test ideas that they might be able to bring back to work.  When was the last time you invited some friends over for some beer and some brainstorming on how redesign a process or a program?  Not because you had to, but because you wanted to.

Our industry’s path forward is not going to be an easy one and we will need a full tank of enthusiasm to support our organizations. How do you talk about your work when introduced to someone new? How do you talk about your work with your  customers?  Are you jumping out of bed every morning eager and interested to enjoy another day at work? Why? Why not?

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